Audiobook on CD Details
Title: Hawaiian Birth Signs - Nā Hō`ailona Hānau
Author: Wendell Kalanikapuaenui Silva
Price: $19.95
Tax: 4.712% HI general excise tax
Product Code: ABHBS1
Shipping Cost: $1.52 ea to United States Only
Shipping Method: USPS to United States Only
Languages: English and Hawaiian
Tracks/Length: 15 Tracks / 36 Minutes
Track 14
Audio MP3

Kui I Ka Poi Chant
Audio MP3

Pahu Drum Oli
Audio MP3

Auhea la oe e na Kona
Audio MP3

playlist

  1. Introduction (1:56)
  2. The Lunar Calendar (3:04)
  3. Kā`elo (January) (1:59)
  4. Kau-lua (February) (2:29)
  5. Nana (March) (3:11)
  6. Welo (April) (2:05)
  7. Ikiiki (May) (2:06)
  8. Ka’aona (June) (2:25)
  9. Hina-la’ele’ele (July) (2:00)
  10. Mahoe-Mua (August) (2:49)
  11. Mahoe-hope (September) (3:56)
  12. Iluwa (October) (2:03)
  13. Welehu (November) (2:01)
  14. Makali’i (December) (3:09)
  15. Closing Remarks (1:08)

 

 

An entertaining and authentic way to learn about Hawaiian mysticism and the secrets of the ancient kahuna kilo hōkū (stargazer, seer) interpreter of the cosmic signs, who used the laws of heaven and earth, an individual’s birth date and other sacred divination tools to forecast a person’s life path. For the first time, the astral mysteries are revealed for all 12 months of the ancient Hawaiian lunar calendar and offers a practical and inspirational guide for living today.

Dramatic narrative enhance the musical highlight – mele (songs) and traditional oli (chants) performed in the kahiko (ancient) style. Powerful calls of the conch shells herald each month and 5 traditional Hawaiian percussion instruments and 2 wind instruments are nature’s many voices: pahu drum, kala`au (dancing sticks), `ili`ili (stone castanets), `uli`uli (rattling feather gourd), ipu heke (double gourd), `ohe hano ihu (bamboo nose flute) and , (conch shell). Their instrumentation masterfully conveys the changing seasons, the ancient Hawaiian gods, and their natural manifestations including: rain, storm, gusty wind – sacred representations of the deities and imbued with great mana.

The listener embarks on a journey of discovery along with the ancient Hawaiian seafarers as they paddle in time to the steady cadence of the pahu in the canoe prayer chant, “Ia Wa`a Nui.” The author cleverly uses the double-hulled canoe to symbolize the dual nature of people born in Kau-lua (February). Auhea la `Oe e na Kona,” a new composition for Nana (March) is accompanied by the kala`au and beckons kama`āina and malihini to behold the serene beauty of Kona, “wreathed in a garland of sea clouds like hinano blossoms.” Springtime blooms in Welo (April) with the sweet melody of the rare `ohe hano ihu instrument of romance and courtship in old Hawai`i. The harvesting and pounding of kalo (taro) into poi made the hard work easier as the men pounded to a rhythmic beat with the `ili`ili which replaces the traditional stone poi pounder. The mele ends with, “a delicious treat, indeed, the best. Ah! Satisfaction guaranteed.” A very special message to the people of Hawai`i is shared in Māhoe-hope (September) and a prayer chant in Makali`i (December) “Pele Honua Mea,” is offered to volcano goddess Pele in the spirit of aloha.

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Hawaiian Birth Signs – Nā Hō`oailona Hānau – Audiobook

Hawaiian Birth Signs – Nā Hō`oailona Hānau – Audiobook

Track 14
Audio MP3

Kui I Ka Poi Chant
Audio MP3

Pahu Drum Oli
Audio MP3

Auhea la oe e na Kona
Audio MP3

playlist

  1. Introduction (1:56)
  2. The Lunar Calendar (3:04)
  3. Kā`elo (January) (1:59)
  4. Kau-lua (February) (2:29)
  5. Nana (March) (3:11)
  6. Welo (April) (2:05)
  7. Ikiiki (May) (2:06)
  8. Ka’aona (June) (2:25)
  9. Hina-la’ele’ele (July) (2:00)
  10. Mahoe-Mua (August) (2:49)
  11. Mahoe-hope (September) (3:56)
  12. Iluwa (October) (2:03)
  13. Welehu (November) (2:01)
  14. Makali’i (December) (3:09)
  15. Closing Remarks (1:08)

 

 

An entertaining and authentic way to learn about Hawaiian mysticism and the secrets of the ancient kahuna kilo hōkū (stargazer, seer) interpreter of the cosmic signs, who used the laws of heaven and earth, an individual’s birth date and other sacred divination tools to forecast a person’s life path. For the first time, the astral mysteries are revealed for all 12 months of the ancient Hawaiian lunar calendar and offers a practical and inspirational guide for living today.

Dramatic narrative enhance the musical highlight – mele (songs) and traditional oli (chants) performed in the kahiko (ancient) style. Powerful calls of the conch shells herald each month and 5 traditional Hawaiian percussion instruments and 2 wind instruments are nature’s many voices: pahu drum, kala`au (dancing sticks), `ili`ili (stone castanets), `uli`uli (rattling feather gourd), ipu heke (double gourd), `ohe hano ihu (bamboo nose flute) and , (conch shell). Their instrumentation masterfully conveys the changing seasons, the ancient Hawaiian gods, and their natural manifestations including: rain, storm, gusty wind – sacred representations of the deities and imbued with great mana.

The listener embarks on a journey of discovery along with the ancient Hawaiian seafarers as they paddle in time to the steady cadence of the pahu in the canoe prayer chant, “Ia Wa`a Nui.” The author cleverly uses the double-hulled canoe to symbolize the dual nature of people born in Kau-lua (February). Auhea la `Oe e na Kona,” a new composition for Nana (March) is accompanied by the kala`au and beckons kama`āina and malihini to behold the serene beauty of Kona, “wreathed in a garland of sea clouds like hinano blossoms.” Springtime blooms in Welo (April) with the sweet melody of the rare `ohe hano ihu instrument of romance and courtship in old Hawai`i. The harvesting and pounding of kalo (taro) into poi made the hard work easier as the men pounded to a rhythmic beat with the `ili`ili which replaces the traditional stone poi pounder. The mele ends with, “a delicious treat, indeed, the best. Ah! Satisfaction guaranteed.” A very special message to the people of Hawai`i is shared in Māhoe-hope (September) and a prayer chant in Makali`i (December) “Pele Honua Mea,” is offered to volcano goddess Pele in the spirit of aloha.

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